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"Green Tails" in 1917 - Willkommen


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Jasta 5 Decorations and Medals

"20 VICTORIES MADE YOU A LEGEND -

80 VICTORIES MADE YOU THE RED BARON"

 

 

Orders, Awards, Decorations and Medals are earned by pilots as described in official "Kriegspiel" posted on the forum.

Ground targets destroyed and successful recons (ground missions) are scored separately from aerial victories,  except as noted.

 

Certification Badges

Prussian Observers Badge

Observers of the German Air Service (GAS) usuallyreceived this badge for regular duty.

 

 

 

 

Awarded to a pilot upon successful completion of the Advanced Bomber training; promotion to Feldwebel rank is concurrent with earning this badge.

Prussian Pilot's Badge

The pilots of the German Air Service usually received the Pilot's Badge after completion of Training and  gaining experience in aerial combat.

 

 

 

Awarded upon successful completion of Advanced Pilots training; promotion to Feldwebel rank is concurrent with receiving this badge.

Retired

Prussian Retired Pilot's Badge

This badge was worn by pilots who were no longer actively flying, whether due to retirement or injuries.

 
Issued to pilots retiring from the Jasta in good standing after a minimum of 3 years active service.

Observer Gunnery Badge
Gunnery 
Gunnery Badge

Only awarded to junior enlisted ranks of Flieger or Gefreiter.  Awarded in recognition of the 5th aerial kill from the back-seat observer position while flying in a qualifying full-real flight environment (i.e. Vintage Missions).

 

Balloon Busting Medals


Balloon Badge

Awarded in recognition of a qualified pilot's 5th balloon busting mission while flying the same virtual life in a qualifying full-real flight environment (i.e. Vintage Missions).

 

Balloon Badge with Oak Leaf

 

Awarded in recognition of a qualified pilot's 55th balloon busting mission while flying the same virtual life in a qualifying full-real flight environment (i.e. Vintage Missions).

 


Balloon Badge with Crown

Awarded in recognition of a qualified pilot's 25th balloon busting mission while flying the same virtual life in a qualifying full-real flight environment (i.e. Vintage Missions).

 

Campaign Service Awards

 

 

 

Campaign Ribbons

Pilots scoring points during a campaign are awarded ribbons.

 

 

Gold Long Service Award

This award was issued for length of service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Awarded in recognition for participating in EVERY mission during a Campaign.

 

The Breast star of the Ernestine House

 

 

 

 

 

 

Awarded in recognition for the highest number of  victories scored by a Jasta pilot during a Campaign.  One award each is given for both aerial and ground targets.

 

Wound Badge

The Wound Badge was established on 3 March 1918 by Wilhelm II, Emperor of Germany and King of Prussia. German military personnel were awarded the Wound Badge in one of three classes. 

 

The Black Wound Badge was awarded for less than three wounds.

 

The Silver Wound Badge was awarded for three or more wounds.

 

The Golden Wound Badge was awarded for severe wounds that permanently injured or disfigured the recipient.  Julius Buckler may have been the only German ace to receive the Golden Wound Badge.   

 

Awarded to a pilot that is wounded in combat and successfully returns to base and repairs without being being killed.  A black shall be awarded for one or two occurrences during a single tournament match.  The silver class shall be awarded for three or more occurrences during a single tournament match.  The gold class will be awarded should a pilot retire from the Jagdstaffeln for medical reasons.

 

Kaiser Wings

These badges are awarded to pilots who have satisfactorily and consistently flown and contributed during an online MMP Campaign.

 

Presented in recognition for participation in each campaign.

 

Jasta Service Awards

Black Long Service Award

This award was issued for length of service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Awarded in recognition for participating in EVERY practice during the preceding 3 month period.

 

Gold Long Service Award with Crown

This award was issued for length of service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Awarded in appreciation of one year of ACTIVE service.

 

Letter of Commendation

 

A letter of Commendation shall be issued to a pilot that performs duties above and beyond the call of duty, and for acts or services for the greater good of the Jagdstaffeln.

 

 


 

Carl Eduard Medal

As a military award, the Oval Silver Duke Carl Eduard Medal with Crown and Sword Clasp, may be included in the same category as the Prussian Iron Cross, as it was awarded without regard to rank. However, there were other limitations that made the award much rarer. Among them, the recipient was to have already received the Iron Cross 1st Class and whichever grade of the Ducal Saxe-Ernestine House Order, Merit Cross or Merit Medals he would have been eligible for based on his rank. These requirements were occasionally waived, however (the medal's most famous recipient, the Red Baron, Manfred Freiherr von Richtofen, had no special connection to Saxe-Coburg-Gotha and had not yet received the Ducal Saxe-Ernestine House Order when he was decorated with it). 

Awarded in acknowledgment of demonstrated loyalty or service to the Jasta.

 

Carl Eduard Kriegskreuz (War Cross)
The Carl Eduard War Cross was founded on July 19, 1916 as a single class pinback decoration for bravery and military merit, awarded without regard to rank. Eligibility requirements were similar to those for the Oval Silver Duke Carl Eduard Medal with Crown and Sword Clasp.

Awarded in recognition for earning the trust of fellow pilots through continued loyalty and service to the Jasta.

 

Order of the Knights of St. John of Jerusalem, Hospitalers-

There were (more-or-less) independent branches of the order in several countries. By the time of the Great War, the Order bestowed awards for outstanding humanitarian aid or hospital work.

 

 

 

Awarded in recognition of humanitarian acts during time of war.

 

Wilhelm Ernst War Cross 

Grand Duke Wilhelm Ernst founded the Wilhelm Ernst War Cross on June 10, 1915. It was awarded without regard to rank, but otherwise had strict requirements: the recipient must have already received the Iron Cross 1st Class.

 

Awarded in appreciation and acknowledgment for services and acts which significantly benefit all of the Jagdstaffel. 

 

The Order of Albert 
31 December 1850 by King Friedrich August II to honor the memory of Duke Albrecht the Brave,  founder of the Albertine Dynasty. The military variation of the decoration was established in 1866.The Order of Albert was originally awarded to "all those who render useful service to the state, or who distinguish themselves through merit, who have earned a claim to Our recognition." Beginning in 1866, the Order of Albert was bestowed upon military personnel for merit in the field and to indicate this, a pair of crossed swords were added to the medal.

 

 

Awarded in appreciation and acknowledgment for services and acts which significantly benefit all of the Jagdstaffel. 

Orden Pour le Merite for the Arts 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Awarded in appreciation for skills and contributions in the arena of arts and technology which significantly enhance the gaming experience for all of the Jagdstaffel. 

 

The Golden Military Merit Cross

Prussia's highest award for non-commissioned officers. Often regarded as equivalent to the Blue Max for officers, it was bestowed upon enlisted personnel for bravery in combat.

 

 

 

Awarded to a pilot following promotion to Feldwebel.  This is the highest award a NCO may earn.

Order of Military Merit - Officer's Cross with Swords

 

 

 

 

 

 

Awarded to officers who have earned the trust of their fellow officers and their command.

 

The Order Brabant

Instituted on 14th of June, 1914, in 12 classes for welfare, and social matters by Grand Duke Ernst Ludwig Larva.  The name  of the order was given because of his ancestor the first Duke of Hessen, Heinrich, from the family line of Brabant.

 

Awarded to the officer who exemplifies the spirit of the Teutonic Knight:  Honor, Chivalry, Courage, and Loyalty are some of the traits that are typical of those to whom this award is granted. 

 

House Order of Vigilance or the "White Falcon"

One of the older German state orders, the Order of the White Falcon was originally established on August 2, 1732 by Duke Ernst-August I. It was renewed by Grand Duke Carl August on October 18, 1815, just a few months after the he was elevated to grand duke. It served as the house order and was awarded for civil and military merit. Swords were authorized on September 22, 1870 to distinguish bravery and merit on the field of battle.

 

Awarded to those who have proven themselves to be an exemplary pilot of Jasta 5.  Characteristics necessary to receive this rare commendation are honor, dedication, leadership and loyalty in addition to a demonstrated respect for the command and other pilots of Jagdstaffel 5. 

The Prussian House Order of Hohenzollern - Knights Eagle

Issued in 1851, the House Order of Hohenzollern always had a special position among the Prussian orders. The highest grade was awarded to bearer's of the Prussian Black Eagle Order only.  They have almost  only been awarded to either citizens in teaching positions or priests. The eagles were more or less given to retirees for their dedicated and honorable service to the Prussian state.

 

Upon retirement from the Jagdstaffel, to pilots who have made significant and lasting contributions to the development and training of other pilots. 

 

Bravery Medals

Prussian Order of the Crown

Instituted in 1861, the Order of the Crown was Prussia's lowest ranking order of chivalry, although it still held considerable status. As with most European orders of the time, it could only be awarded to commissioned officers (or civilians of approximately equivalent status), but there was a medal associated with the order which could be earned by non- commissioned officers and enlisted men. This order was not frequently awarded for combat actions during the war, although awards "with swords" were made in great numbers to military personnel, for general merit.

 

Awarded to a pilot for repeated acts of valor in performing bombing or reconnaissance missions in combat.

 

Austro-Hungarian Empire Bravery Medal 

Classes: Four; the Gold, the Silver in first and second class and the Bronze.  The Bravery Medal (Tapferkeits Medaille) was awarded to military personnel for acts of bravery in combat. For each subsequent act of bravery, recipients were awarded a bar in the appropriate class.

 

 

Awarded to a pilot for acts of valor in combat.

 

Bavarian Bravery Medal

Awarded for acts of bravery in combat.

 

 

 

 

Awarded to a pilot for repeated acts of valor in performing bombing or reconnaissance missions in combat.

Austro-Hungarian Empire Order of the Iron Crown 


Established in 1805 by Napoleon I, King of Italy, the Coronne de Fer was awarded in three classes: Grand Dignitary, Dignitary and Knight. In 1815, the order was adopted by Austria after regaining control of Northern Italy. Re-established on 1 January 1816 by Emperor Franz I of Austria, it became known as the Order of the Iron Crown (Orden der Eisernen-Krone) and was awarded in three grades to noblemen.  During World War I, the Order of the Iron Crown was bestowed upon military officers for acts of bravery. Recipients could receive the order more than once for additional acts of bravery.

 

Awarded to a pilot who displays repeated acts of bravery in combat.

 

Hanover Commander's Cross 

The Hanover Commander's Cross was a Prussian order of the state of Hanover. Only bestowed upon officers. 

 

 

 

 

 

Awarded to officers for repeated acts of  bravery in combat.

 

King Ludwig Bavarian Knights Cross

During World War I, the Bavarian Military Merit Cross was Bayern's highest award for officers. Often regarded as equivalent to Prussia's Blue Max. It was awarded for excellence in combat.  Only bestowed upon officers.

 

 

 

Awarded to officers for repeated acts of  bravery in combat.

Bombing, Reconnaissance and Spotting

Victory Awards


During WWI pilots in the German Army Air Force first began their careers in two-seater planes.  Two-seater pilots were evaluated and rewarded primarily based upon two factors:  number of sorties (time of service) and accuracy (bombing;recon success etc).  Pilots who showed promise as two-seater pilots (i.e. survivability in a slower often less maneuverable plane than the enemy) were then selected for einsitzer (one-seater) fighter pilot training.

Consistent with the above historical perspective, below is a custom metric developed by Bäumer and Matthias for Jasta 5 to reward consistent performance by two-seater pilots over time.  We call it "Bomber Efficiency", or "BE".  Because this is an exponential metric rather than linear, a pilot with a BE rating double another pilot is actually more than twice as good stat wise. Click here to see the formula.

This method of using a sustained average allows some "slack" for those working on the longer awards. A rough month along the way will not necessarily require starting over, especially if you're really putting in months with averages consistently well over 16.

So what does it take then to earn a BE of 20 in a month? It actually varies quite a bit. You can either be super lucky/careful and kill a moderate amount, or kill a ton and die considerably more often. As was the case with all requirements for awards in the war, the BE required is subject to change. 

Requirements:
First, it is necessary for a two-seater pilot to fly enough sorties and destroy enough targets with few enough relifes in order to reach a BE rating of 20 to "get on the board".  For all subsequent months, it is necessary for the pilot to sustain an average BE of 16 or higher to earn credit towards two-seater awards in the manners described below:

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Iron Cross 2nd Class

The Iron Cross was awarded in three Classes:  the Grand Cross ("Grosskreuz") for senior commanders (only 5 awarded), 2nd Class for individual merit in combat (5 million), and the 1st Class for acts of heroism or bravery in combat (1 million).  The Eisernes Kreuz all looked the same, it's where you wore them that told the difference:  Grand Cross around the neck, 1st Class pinned to the left side of the tunic about two inches above the belt, and for the 2nd Class, you merely wore the ribbon looped through the second button hole in the front of the uniform.  The Iron Cross has the distinction of being one of the few Prussian awards handed out to both officers and enlisted men equally - probably because of it's long history as an award for valor. The Iron Cross, 2nd Class, usually came after a few successful missions (for 2-seater pilots) or the first few "kills" for a Kampflieger.

 

Awarded in recognition of a qualified two-seater pilot's 1st month flying with a BE of 20 while flying in a qualified full-real flight environment.

 

Iron Cross

 

Iron Cross 1st Class

The Iron Cross was originally established on 10 March 1813 by King Friedrich Wilhelm III. It was reestablished in 1870 during the Franco-Prussian war and again on 5 August 1914 by Wilhelm II, Emperor of Germany and King of Prussia.  Issued in three classes, the 1914 Iron Cross was awarded without regard for nationality or social class to combatants and noncombatants for acts of heroism, bravery or leadership. Although the medals of each class were identical, the manner in which each was worn differed. Employing a pin or screw posts on the back of the medal, the Iron Cross First Class was worn on the left side of the recipient's uniform. 

Awarded in recognition of a qualified two-seater pilot's 6th month flying with a BE of 16 while flying in a qualified full-real flight environment.

 

Knights' Cross of the Order of the House of Hohenzollern

Established 23 August 1851 by Frederick William IV, The Knight's Cross of the Order of the House of Hohenzollern was a Prussian order only bestowed upon officers. For acts of bravery in combat, the decoration was adorned with crossed swords. It was most often awarded to recipients who had already received the Iron Cross 1st Class. 

 

Awarded in recognition of a qualified two-seater pilot's 12th consecutive month flying with a BE of 16 while flying in a qualified full-real flight environment.

 

 

The Military Order of St. Henry

Awarded to serving officers, either for conspicuous personal bravery on the battlefield or, more frequently in the case of officers of higher rank, for merit in positions of great responsibility. The Military Order of St. Henry was the highest Saxon decoration bestowed upon members of the German Air Service and was most often awarded to pilots and observers of Flieger, Feldflieger and Bomber Abteilungen.

 

Awarded in recognition of a qualified two-seater pilot's 24th consecutive month flying with a BE of 16 while flying in a qualified full-real flight environment.

 

PLM
Orden Pour le Mérite (The Blue Max)
Established in 1667 by Margrave Frederick (later to become King Frederick I), it was originally known as the Order of Generosity. Reorganized by Frederick II in 1740, it became the Order for Military and Civil Merit (pour le mérite). It was again reorganized in 1810 by Frederick William III and became the Order of Military Merit. In 1842, Frederick William IV added a civil class for scholars, painters, sculptors, and musicians. During World War I, Prussia's highest military award, the Orden Pour le Mérite, was awarded for a pattern of repeated and continual gallantry in action. It was never awarded posthumously. Recipients were required to wear the medal whenever they were in uniform. Following the armistice of 1918, it was never again awarded for military service. 

Awarded in recognition of a qualified two-seater pilot's 36th consecutive month flying with a BE of 16 while flying in a qualified full-real flight environment.

 

Order of King Leopold

An Austrian decoration, this appears to be a Commander’s Cross – The Knights Cross (technically the "kleinkreuz" – small cross – was minus the crown) was awarded to the most outstanding Austrian fliers. Consider it an Austrian Blue Max.

 

 

 

Awarded in recognition of a qualified two-seater pilot's 60th consecutive month flying with a BE of 16 while flying in a qualified full-real flight environment.

 

 

Aerial Combat Victory Awards
With the exception of the Ehrenbecher, aerial victories are earned on a "streak" basis by pilots holding the rank of Unteroffizier or higher while flying a single "virtual" pilot life in qualifying full-real servers and events.

 

Ehrenbecher  (Cup of Honour)

A special award given from the Rittmeister himself, the Ehrenbecher was designed by Manfred von Richthofen.  This award is to be ceremoniously given to each pilot that scores his first kill.

 

   

Awarded in recognition of a qualified pilot's 1st confirmed aerial victory in an qualified full-real flight environment.

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Iron Cross 2nd Class

The Iron Cross was awarded in three Classes:  the Grand Cross ("Grosskreuz") for senior commanders (only 5 awarded), 2nd Class for individual merit in combat (5 million), and the 1st Class for acts of heroism or bravery in combat (1 million).  The Eisernes Kreuz all looked the same, it's where you wore them that told the difference:  Grand Cross around the neck, 1st Class pinned to the left side of the tunic about two inches above the belt, and for the 2nd Class, you merely wore the ribbon looped through the second button hole in the front of the uniform.  The Iron Cross has the distinction of being one of the few Prussian awards handed out to both officers and enlisted men equally - probably because of it's long history as an award for valor. The Iron Cross, 2nd Class, usually came after a few successful missions (for 2-seater pilots) or the first few "kills" for a Kampflieger.

 

Awarded in recognition of a qualified pilot's 3rd confirmed consecutive aerial victory while flying the same virtual life in an qualified full-real flight environment.

 

 

Iron Cross

Iron Cross 1st Class

The Iron Cross was originally established on 10 March 1813 by King Friedrich Wilhelm III. It was reestablished in 1870 during the Franco-Prussian war and again on 5 August 1914 by Wilhelm II, Emperor of Germany and King of Prussia.  Issued in three classes, the 1914 Iron Cross was awarded without regard for nationality or social class to combatants and noncombatants for acts of heroism, bravery or leadership. Although the medals of each class were identical, the manner in which each was worn differed. Employing a pin or screw posts on the back of the medal, the Iron Cross First Class was worn on the left side of the recipient's uniform. 

 

Awarded in recognition of a qualified pilot's 6th confirmed consecutive aerial victory while flying the same virtual life in an qualified full-real flight environment.

 

Knights' Cross of the Order of the House of Hohenzollern

Established 23 August 1851 by Frederick William IV, The Knight's Cross of the Order of the House of Hohenzollern was a Prussian order only bestowed upon officers. For acts of bravery in combat, the decoration was adorned with crossed swords. It was most often awarded to recipients who had already received the Iron Cross 1st Class. 

 

Awarded in recognition of a qualified pilot's 10th confirmed consecutive aerial victory while flying the same virtual life in an qualified full-real flight environment.

 

Military Merit Cross 3rd Class with War Decoration

This Austrian award was roughly equivalent to the Prussian award of the same name, and was awarded for conspicuous acts of bravery.  It also appears to have been awarded to German fliers. It lies between the Knight’s Cross and the Blue Max in stature.

 

 

Awarded in recognition of a qualified pilot's 15th confirmed consecutive aerial victory while flying the same virtual life in an qualified full-real flight environment.

 

Orden Pour le Mérite (The Blue Max)

Established in 1667 by Margrave Frederick (later to become King Frederick I), it was originally known as the Order of Generosity. Reorganized by Frederick II in 1740, it became the Order for Military and Civil Merit (pour le mérite). It was again reorganized in 1810 by Frederick William III and became the Order of Military Merit. In 1842, Frederick William IV added a civil class for scholars, painters, sculptors, and musicians. During World War I, Prussia's highest military award, the Orden Pour le Mérite, was awarded for a pattern of repeated and continual gallantry in action. It was never awarded posthumously. Recipients were required to wear the medal whenever they were in uniform. Following the armistice of 1918, it was never again awarded for military service. 

 

Awarded in recognition of a qualified pilot's 20th confirmed consecutive aerial victory while flying the same virtual life in an qualified full-real flight environment.

 

Bavarian Military Merit Cross

During World War I, the Bavarian Military Merit Cross was Bayern's highest award for non-commissioned officers. In an unusual breach of protocol, it was awarded to von Richthoften, a non-Bavarian, in 3rd Klasse but in an unusually high form, with swords and crown, following his successes in "Bloody April" 1917.

Awarded in recognition of a qualified pilot's 40th confirmed consecutive aerial victory while flying the same virtual life in an qualified full-real flight environment.

 

Order of the Red Eagle 3rd Class with Crown and Swords

An award given for over-all meritorious service to junior officers in Prussian service, it was seldom awarded in WWI. Only one German flyer  received it: Manfred vonRichthofen – and that mostly because the AOK had run out of awards to give him (and some technicalities; read below)! 

   

Awarded in recognition of a qualified pilot's 70th confirmed consecutive aerial victory while flying the same virtual life in an qualified full-real flight environment.

 

Orden Pour le Merite mit Eichlaub (Oak Leaves)

 

Oak leaves are added to a previously earned Orden Pour le Mérite, for a pattern for those who had successfully defended a fortress or won a battle. 

 

Originally nominated for his continued scoring, leadership and inspiration, vonRichthofen was nominated for the Oak Leaves, but was turned down as not having made an especially significant contribution to the "war effort" nor meeting the technical requirement of defending a fortress or winning an actual battle. He was instead awarded the Red Eagle above.  General Ludendorff was reportedly incensed at the denial.  It is believed by some historians that had vonRichthofen scored his "century", he would have received this award and so it is used here.

 

The Oak Leaf cluster is added to the Blue Max in recognition of a qualified pilot's 100th confirmed consecutive aerial victory while flying the same virtual life in an qualified full-real flight environment.

 

 

Awards sourced from Hermann-historica and JG1.

Special thanks to Neal W. O'Conner for his work.

 

This is a not-for profit, non-commercial site. Historical accuracy has been a goal, so if you see that something is missing, needs to be corrected or changed, please let me know.  I have tried to give proper credit to sources where ever possible.  If you see something that may infringe on your rights, please just let me know.  I will be happy to correct it to your satisfaction. This website is dedicated to the enhancement and enjoyment of World War I flight simulations, not the promotion of any political or philosophical views.    Red Baron 3D is a registered trademark of Mad Otter Games.  Rise of Flight is a registered trademark of 777 Studios.

©Paul Bäumer 2004 - 2017.   All rights reserved.